Spotlight: Rebecca Lee

Introducing Rebecca Lee who will be releasing a limited print run of her novelette Object Relations: A Novelette with RCP!  Here’s your chance to get to know Rebecca before it comes out.


Synopsis:

Object Relations Theory: A form of psychoanalytic theory postulating that people relate to others in order to develop themselves.

Through long divisions of interpretation, words sectioned into sentences. Uncomfortable, they bunched together, worried their independence lost. Together, all the words decided they should be bound in unison forever. Their books stain the beliefs that we continue to hold.

Rebecca Lee’s collection of vignettes demonstrates the various imaginary relationships of personified objects. From door knobs to smartphones, everyday encounters come alive.


1. First, tell us a little about yourself. When did you want to become an author? What inspires you to do what you do? Who are you?

I have always wanted to be a writer. Ever since I could pick up a pen, I’ve been glued to various notebooks. I love the sensation of hiding my words behind paper. It feels like I’m telling a secret to myself.

2. What are some quirky and or unique aspects about you and your writing?

I like to believe that everything has a perspective. If two people can look at the same thing and come up with several different stories, that means it exists and is therefore writing-worthy.

3.RCP “was founded in 2016 to showcase quality fiction, diverse stories, and unexpected protagonists.” What does that mean to you?

I think the word ‘ordinary’ is really fascinating. Even a word that is supposed to mean common, has a million different definitions depending on who you are talking to. With every object that is fictionalized in my book, I try to show a side that may not have been previously thought about. That way ‘normal’ can have several representations.

4. What made you start a blog? Has it influenced your writing in general? How did Object Relations come about?

I’ve been writing in a blog since I was 14. At first it influenced my writing because I wrote for friends. Descriptions I would have poured out in my journal, transformed into stories that I thought friends might find amusing. Object Relations came about early on. When I was a child I would write about object’s personified. I guess I always hung onto it because I could shape something that wasn’t real into anything I wanted.

5. How has writing affected your outlook on things? Has it made you take chances or see things in a different light?

That’s a very difficult question to answer. I’ve been writing almost my whole life, so I can’t imagine what I (or my life) would be like without it. I’d like to say it’s made me take chances and risks I might not have otherwise taken, but I have no idea. It’s my brain. For better or worse, it’s always a part of me.

6. What are you most excited to share when it comes to Object Relations? Ex). A particular vignette or object?

There are many sides to the same coin. (Bad pun I know)

7. Finally, do you have any advice and or tips for aspiring writers out there, especially women?

Write every day. Whether you’re a woman or a man, dedication and discipline are a lasting marriage.

Spotlight: Amber R. Duell

Introducing Radiant Crown Publishing’s debut author Amber R. Duell! Her novel, Fragile Chaos, is a young adult fantasy and romance that will be released next year. It’s been edited by the lovely Leah Brown, and the cover design is currently underway. Proofreading, map-making, and much more is on the horizon. But first, here’s your chance to get to know Amber and her story a bit more.


Synopsis:

A GOD OF WAR SEEKING RESTORATION.

AN UNWILLING SACRIFICIAL BRIDE.

BETRAYAL THAT COULD DESTROY THEM BOTH.

“[E]very fiber of my being is woven from the rage of mortals.”

Theodric, the young God of War, has a talent for inciting conflict and bloodshed. After being stripped of his powers by his older brother, King of Gods, he sets out to instigate a mortal war to prove himself worthy of being restored to power.

“I loved Kisk once; it was my home… But that was before. This is now.”

Sixteen-year-old Cassia, like many in the modern era, believes gods and goddesses to be just a myth. Enemy to her country and an orphan of the war, she has no time for fairy tales. That’s until religious zealots from Theo’s sect offer her up as a sacrifice.

Can Cassia and Theo end the mortal war and return balance to the earth and heavens? Or, will their game of fate lead down a path of destruction, betrayal, and romance neither of them saw coming?


1. First, tell us a little about yourself. When did you want to become an author? What inspires you to do what you do? Who are you?

Deep down I’ve always wanted to be an author but it wasn’t until after floundering through a few different majors in college that I decided to follow my heart. Having grown up listening to fairy tales and fantastical adventures, writing always called to me. Making the impossible possible. Discovering the answer to what if? Traveling to places where magic is real and anything can happen. There’s no better feeling than the spark of a new story igniting.

2. What are some quirky and or unique aspects about you and your writing?

I tend to listen to the same handful of songs over and over when I write. Sometimes they change with the manuscript, sometimes not. Also, I write in layers. My first draft is more like a glorified 30-40k word outline, followed by separate drafts to add in character arcs, world-building, ect.

3. RCP “was founded in 2016 to showcase quality fiction, diverse stories, and unexpected protagonists.” What does that mean to you?

It’s very exciting to see books coming out that explore different cultures, races, and sexuality. Whether it’s in our world or fantasy, it’s so very important that everyone is able to find characters they easily identify with. The same with unexpected protagonists. They show that a flawed character with a sketchy past and habit of doing things the unconventional way can succeed with bravery and good intentions. No one is perfect and I love that showcasing unexpected protagonists proves that’s okay.

4. What do you think makes a great young adult title? How do you think your piece Fragile Chaos fits into or varies from that description?

Relatable characters and emotional truths. I think seeing a character make mistakes, then making proactive choices to overcome them, is important. As is not stereotyping teenagers as whiny or self-absorbed when there are so many intelligent, caring teens out there. Fragile Chaos deals with heavier topics, like war, but centers on the characters and the choices they make. They aren’t always right but through their story, they make realizations that help them grow.

5. How has writing affected your outlook on things? Has it made you take chances or see things in a different light?

It definitely makes me view things differently. To understand every character, I have to understand their motivation which means stepping into their shoes. It’s taught me to look at all sides of an argument and, while I don’t have to agree, it is important to understand and consider all viewpoints.

6. What are you most excited to share when it comes to Fragile Chaos? Ex). The world, the characters, a specific scene?

There is one scene I’m rather partial to but can’t specify without spoilers. A lot leads up to that moment. I’m also looking forward to sharing the new pantheon of gods.

7. Finally, do you have any advice and or tips for aspiring writers out there, especially women?

Don’t wait for someone to tell you it’s okay to be a writer. If you have a story within you, let it out. Do it because you love it. There will always be naysayers but have confidence in yourself. Use every can’t and won’t to fuel your passion. Pour yourself into the work and, whether it’s your first manuscript or your tenth, you can and you will.